Breaking Commandments 8 & 9 – Stealing and Lying

Mmmmmm....yummy, especially with dry ice

Mmmmmm….yummy, especially with dry ice

Growing up, I didn’t attend a lot of church.  On Goodman Avenue, (ages 5-10), I attended Vacation Bible School (VBS) a few weeks in the summer.  I don’t think church was Dad’s thing and Mom’s thing was doing whatever Dad said.  When Mom got divorced and married to Joe, she discovered that she had quite a bit more freedom to do as she pleased.  Finding her church was one of those.

Even though we didn’t attend church on a regular basis when I was young, we were raised under a Christian roof.  As such, we were taught the Ten Commandments.  Well, ok…we were too young to discuss half of them, but numbers 3, 5, 6, 8 & 9 – those we knew.  If we broke them, we knew we’d meet up with a belt or a switch.  Eight and Nine, those two I was scared to death to break because my Dad warned us about them on a regular basis.

8 & 9?  Stealing and lying; never steal and never lie.  One day I did both.  I did both, was immediately found out and then immediately punished for my crimes. Continue reading

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Willows do not Always Weep

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I think I first learned to be generous from my very first childhood friend, Timmy.  My parents had moved from Fairfield, Ohio to Goodman Ave in Hamilton when I was 4 years old.  I lived immediately across the street from Timmy, he and I were the same age  and we were in the same classes from Kindergarten through Second grades.  From Tim I first learned the true meanings of loyalty, dependability, friendship and how to give.  Much more about Tim in another story, but for this one I wanted to mention Tim’s giving nature.  Through fourth grade until my parents moved to Prytania, we were peas and carrots.  Tim treated me as a brother.  Tim was a tough little fighter and he would take on anyone who attacked his friends.   Timmy was his mom’s ‘little man’ and was showered with any toy he ever wanted.  I would go so far as to say that he was a bit spoiled by his mom.  But Tim was not stingy – he would share with everyone and especially with me, he always made it clear that I could have anything I wanted.  If we went to Highland Park Dairy, (as we often did), Tim would typically have some change and that meant I would have change.  My early takeaway from Tim was that if you had something and your friend did not, you shared.  It was a simple lesson and it’s one I try to continue to emulate. Continue reading